Research

New York State Surveyor General Survey Maps of Lands in New York and Vermont

Held by the New York State Archives


Overview of the Records

Repository:

New York State Archives

New York State Education Department

Cultural Education Center

Albany, NY 12230

Summary:
These survey maps were made for landholders, for partitioning of land, and for disposition of as yet unappropriated lands. Most maps depict areas of eastern upstate New York; some, , show lands bordering on or within Vermont. The maps generally provide: name, location, or number of the town, tract, patent, or Indian reservation surveyed; lot boundaries and dimensions; lot numbers; names of landholders (sometimes); waterways; and the number of acres in area surveyed (sometimes).
Creator:
Title:
Quantity:
circa 4 cubic feet (116 maps) : bulk manuscript, ink, pencil, encapsulated ; 46 x 56 cm or smaller
Inclusive Dates:
1736-1822
Bulk Dates:
bulk 1760-1790
Series Number:
A4011

Arrangement

Numerical by map number.

Administrative History

Early relations between New York and Vermont were inextricably linked to the land, and marked by a struggle to establish boundaries and defend property rights. The period covered by the bulk of these records correlates with the formative years of Vermont statehood.

New York Governor George Clinton initially refused to recognize the state of Vermont, although in 1778 he offered to confirm land titles to all inhabitants who would admit the jurisdiction of New York. In 1790 commissioners from the two states agreed that New York would recognize Vermont independence and boundaries in return for Vermont paying New York for land claims. Vermont entered the union in 1791.

Migration was a continuing factor in relations between the two states. The landed aristocracy, through close association with the merchant class, acquired large tracts of land in western and northern New York. Large numbers of people migrated to New York's north country from the Green Mountains across Lake Champlain to settle. It has been estimated that in 1850 one-fifth of the population of Vermont had become citizens of New York.

Scope and Content Note

These are maps of surveys made for landholders, for partitioning of land, and for disposition of as yet unappropriated lands. The Surveyor General produced these maps in keeping with his responsibilities for surveying and mapping state lands. Most maps depict areas of eastern upstate New York; some show lands bordering on or within Vermont.

The maps generally provide: name, location, or number of the town, tract, patent, or Indian reservation surveyed; lot boundaries and dimensions; lot numbers; names of landholders (sometimes); waterways; and the number of acres in area surveyed (sometimes).

A few maps of larger areas show the layout and boundaries of various towns in the region. Most of the maps are manuscript; a small number are printed. Some of the manuscript maps are very faded, and a few suffered burn damage in the 1911 State Capitol fire. Similar maps are found in series A0273, Survey Maps of Lands in New York State.

Use of Records

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions regarding access to or use of the material.

Alternate Formats Available

Microform is available at the New York State Archives through interlibrary loan.

Related Information

Related Materials

Series A0273 Survey Maps of Lands in New York State, contains similar maps.

Other finding aids

David E. E. Mix published a list of these "State Hall Maps" in Catalogue of Maps and Surveys in the Offices of the Secretary of State, State Engineer and Surveyor, and Comptroller, and the New York State Library (Albany, 1859), pp. 322-328. Items listed on p. 328 under the heading "Maps on Rollers" are not found in New York State Archives holdings.

Custodial History

Previously the maps had been stored in portfolios at the State Hall in the Education Building, Albany.

Access Terms

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